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BIRD OF THE MONTH!

August 2019 Bird Of Month
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Sedge Wren

A small, secretive wren that breeds in short grass and sedge marshes. Perhaps because of the highly transitory nature of its nesting habitats, the Sedge Wren moves around a great deal from year to year, not staying in one place for long. The Sedge Wren is one of the most nomadic territorial birds in North America. On a given area, it may be present in numbers in one year, and be completely absent the next. Nest consists of a round ball of grasses and sedges, with entrance on side. Runs on ground to avoid predators. Usually flies only a short distance before diving back into grass. Song begins with a few single notes followed by a weak staccato trill or chatter. Can be found locally at Sandhill Lake and Owego Wetlands.

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Loess Hills Audubon Society meets at the Dorothy Pecaut Nature Center, 4500 Sioux River Road the first Thursday of the month during the months of October thru May at 7:30 P.M. The first meeting of the year is the annual potluck at Stone Lodge in Stone State Park at 6:00 P.M.

Each of these meetings includes a quality program of various subjects. The public is invited and welcome to attend these meetings. Check the Meetings Page for information on upcoming programs.

Birding outings occur monthly. The public is invited and welcome to attend these outings. Check the Outings Page for information on upcoming outings.

Loess Hills Audubon Society
PO Box 5133
Sioux City, IA 51102
http://lhas.tripod.com/
 
 

Mission Statement

The Loess Hills Audubon Society exists to educate individuals and the general public, to enjoy and promote birding, to support ornithology, and to be an advocate for wild areas and environmental issues.

 

"Loess Hills Audubon Society is a Chapter of National Audubon Society, Inc."

Last Month's Bird Of The Month

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Gray Catbird by Jan Null

If you’re convinced you’ll never be able to learn bird calls, start with the Gray Catbird. Once you’ve heard its catty mew you won’t forget it. Follow the sound into thickets and vine tangles and you’ll be rewarded by a somber gray bird with a black cap and bright rusty feathers under the tail. Gray Catbirds are relatives of mockingbirds and thrashers, and they share that group’s vocal abilities, copying the sounds of other species and stringing them together to make their own song. Catbirds are secretive but energetic, hopping and fluttering from branch to branch through tangles of vegetation. Catbirds are reluctant to fly across open areas, preferring quick, low flights over vegetation. Catbirds from across North America spend winters along the Gulf Coast from Florida through Texas and all the way down Central America and the Caribbean. Found locally at Bacon Creek and Stone Park.