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BIRD OF THE MONTH!

October 2019 Bird Of Month
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Double-crested Cormorant

The gangly Double-crested Cormorant is a prehistoric-looking, matte-black fishing bird with yellow-orange facial skin. These solid, heavy-boned birds float low on the surface of water and are experts at diving to catch small fish. They dive and chase fish underwater with powerful propulsion from their webbed feet. The tip of a cormorant’s upper bill is shaped like a hook, which is helpful for catching prey. Cormorants often stand in the sun with their wings spread out to dry. They have less preen oil than other birds, so their feathers can get soaked rather than shedding water like a duck’s. The double crest of the Double-crested Cormorant is only visible on adults during breeding season. They make deep, guttural grunts that sound a bit like an oinking pig. Populations in the continental interior migrate to southern and southeastern U.S. Found locally at Snyder’s Bend and Brown’s Lake.

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Loess Hills Audubon Society meets at the Dorothy Pecaut Nature Center, 4500 Sioux River Road the first Thursday of the month during the months of October thru May at 7:30 P.M. The first meeting of the year is the annual potluck at Stone Lodge in Stone State Park at 6:00 P.M.

Each of these meetings includes a quality program of various subjects. The public is invited and welcome to attend these meetings. Check the Meetings Page for information on upcoming programs.

Birding outings occur monthly. The public is invited and welcome to attend these outings. Check the Outings Page for information on upcoming outings.

Loess Hills Audubon Society
PO Box 5133
Sioux City, IA 51102
http://lhas.tripod.com/
 
 

Mission Statement

The Loess Hills Audubon Society exists to educate individuals and the general public, to enjoy and promote birding, to support ornithology, and to be an advocate for wild areas and environmental issues.

 

"Loess Hills Audubon Society is a Chapter of National Audubon Society, Inc."

Last Month's Bird Of The Month

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Eastern Kingbird

With dark gray upperparts and a neat white tip to the tail, the Eastern Kingbird looks like it’s wearing a business suit. And this big-headed, broad-shouldered bird does mean business—just watch one harassing crows, Red-tailed Hawks, Great Blue Herons, and other birds that pass over its territory. Eastern Kingbirds often perch on wires in open areas and either sally out for flying insects or flutter slowly over the tops of grasses. Parent Eastern Kingbirds feed their young for about seven weeks. Because of this relatively long period of dependence, a pair generally raises only one brood of young per nesting season. Long-distance migrant. Eastern Kingbirds migrate by day in flocks of 10 to 60 birds, joining much larger flocks when crossing bodies of water. They spend winters in South American forests, where they eat mainly fruit. Can be found locally in open habitats such as yards, fields, pastures, grasslands, or wetlands.